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SCULPTURE

Gears
Gears
Gears

Gears

202o

plywood, wood stain
48 x 42 x
.9 in 

“Gears” is a wall hanging which functions as interactive art for viewers. I designed this piece by using a gear simulator program to map out all of the properties, sizes, and locations of the gears. I then created a radial engraving pattern for each of the gears in Adobe Illustrator, as well as a backboard. The design was then cut out and carved into plywood with a CNC router. The gears can be spun using the attached handle. The radial pattern and the engraving inside the gears pull the viewer into an infinite spiraling loophole that seems to never end.

thevillage.jpg
The Village
The Village

The Village

2021
steel, enamel paint, wire, fabric
24 x 24 x 5 in

This sculpture was inspired by the architecture of fishing villages. Each section of steel was created with a plasma cutter and then welded together. Recycled fabric scraps are sewn onto steel rods, and the steel is finished with enamel paint and recycled paper scraps.

Fly
Fly
Fly

Fly

2020
steel
30 x 46 x 6.5 in

This project consisted of creating a wearable sculpture out of steel using a CNC plasma cutting machine. The first thing that came to my mind when I was introduced to this project is that I wanted to create something for my body that would allow me to freely express how I felt in 2020. This led to the idea of creating a set of butterfly wings that fit over each arm. Butterflies are a meaningful symbol in my life as they are known to represent a period of transformation in a woman’s life. For me, 2020 has been a transformative year in many ways, for good and worse. By creating butterfly wings for myself to wear, I’m able to embrace the freedom and beauty that entails all of the transformative changes in my life.  The result of this project is two separate butterfly wings that have loops to fit over each shoulder. The arm loops were created by bending steel and riveting them onto each wing. The steel is finished off with an acrylic patina of the colors blue, purple, and red.

Bird Horn
Bird Horn
Bird Horn

Bird Horn

2022
3D-printed PLA, found objects

Inspired by Christina Rossetti's poem, "A Dirge." 

Lock and Key
Lock and Key
Lock & Key

Lock & Key

2022
bronze, ink on raw ca
nvas

This bronze figure of a head features a lock system that can open and close the jaw using the key that hangs below. Opening the jaw will reveal the dyed canvas underneath, depicting a recurring nightmare of mine which I wish to keep locked away forever.

Where am I Headed
Where am I Headed
Where am I...

Where am I Headed? & The Climb to Get There

2021

Plywood, wood stain, plaster, burlap, thread, spray paint, moss, dried oyster mushrooms 

49.5 x 22 x 85 in

Where am I Headed? & The Climb to Get There is a sculpture that is intended to evoke questions of its dark and nightmarish presence. The extended length of burlap is intimidating in its present form and almost rejects viewers from being invited to walk up to the sculpture it is connected to and view it up close. Above the burlap is a floating plaster cast of a face which is obscured by decomposing elements such as fungus and moss. This form is elevated because of the wooden sculptural element that descends to the ground and curves back to the burlap fabric, almost like a staircase. Where am I Headed? was created before The Climb to Get There, and at first was intended to have the ability to exist as a separate sculpture. After reflection and careful thought, I decided to ditch that idea because both of the sculptures bring more meaning to each other when they exist together, hence the “&” in the title. Where am I Headed? & The Climb to Get There exemplifies the rigorous and uneven path that we take through life that is often unexpected and scary. Life almost feels like an uphill battle, which is why I used plywood to portray a staircase form that resembles the outline of a mountain. The length of the wooden planks connects to how humans begin life as small beings with small perspectives on life and later grow up to be big, wise people. The decomposing face embodies the stark realization of death, which everyone will be greeted by after the path of life has been climbed and overcome. The long extension of fabric illustrates my own spiritual beliefs of what is to come after death: reincarnation. The burlap is a dark flowing void that represents the unknown and unseen, then meets back to the starting point of the pathway, which symbolizes my interpretation of the complete circle of life.

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